Link to Missouri Botanical Garden Plant Finder Link to Five Springs Farm Plant Information Sheet (pdf)
Native to southeast Ohio Deer-resistant
Native to eastern United States Likes full sun
Native to North America Likes shade
Edible for humans Evergreen or wintergreen
Pollinator-friendly plant Suitable for wet sites
Tolerates clay soils Drought-resistant once established

Please also note: This is only and ever a partial list. We always have plants at the nursery that just came in, or that we only have one or a few specimens of; come by to see all of what's available!


Also, these are all container-grown trees. We can special-order trees of almost any size balled & burlapped, or of many larger sizes that are container grown. We can also special order many species that are not part of our regular stock. Call us!

 

Evergreens, Conifers, Ginkgo


Araucaria araucana - monkey-puzzle
Zones 7-10; Height: 80 feet; Spread: 30 feet
A curious evergreen, related to the Norfolk Island pine. Needs to be grown in a container and taken into shelter during the winter.

Chamaecyparis "Gold Thread" - Gold Thread
Zones 4-8; Height: 5 feet; Spread: 4 feet

Chamaecyparis thyoides "Glauca" - Glauca Atlantic white cedar
Zones 4-8; Height: 5 feet; Spread: 4 feet
A tree that resembles an arborvitae but has blue-gray foliage with bright green new growing tips. In nature, this is a swamp plant but will thrive in normal soils. It can reach 20 feet or more in height. The MoBot link is for the species, not this specific cultivar. Ready late spring 2017.

Cryptomeria japonica - Cryptomeria
A beautiful relative of the sequoias, looking somewhat like a redcedar. Dislikes hot summers but hardy. Use in a cooler spot.

Ginkgo biloba - maidenhair tree
Zones 4-8; Height: 5 feet; Spread: 4 feet
The world's most primitive seed tree. Attractive fan-shaped leaves, brilliant yellow fall color. The leaves have the characteristic that they all fall almost at once. We cannot guarantee whether these trees are male or female. The females have a plum-like fruit in the fall that has an unpleasant odor. The Chinese have often eaten the nuts out of the fruit.

Juniperus virginiana - redcedar
Zones 2-9; Height: 65 feet; Spread: 25 feet
A rough, tough evergreen that can grow almost anywhere. It has a particular liking for limestone soils, often found clinging to the tops of limestone and dolomite cliffs. Has a well-known "lollipop" shape when young, but becomes more open-branched and rangy when old, when it becomes a very picturesque specimen. One of the most drought-resistant plants we sell.

Juniperus virginiana "Gray Owl" - Gray Owl redcedar
Zones 2-9; Height: 3 feet, Spread: 6 feet
A dwarf form of the eastern redcedar - A rough, tough evergreen that can grow almost anywhere.

Larix laricina - American larch, tamarack
Zones 2-5; Height: 60 feet, Spread: 30 feet
A deciduous "evergreen," very beautifully picturesque. Tolerates very wet soils. Common in New England.

Metasequoia glyptostroboides - dawn redwood
Zone 4-8; Height: 80 feet, Spread: 25 feet
A living fossil, this beautiful tree was found in China when it was thought to be extinct. Resembles baldcypress. Still occurs in highly isolated groves in remote areas. Fast-growing when young, but slows up considerably when it gets to about 30 feet.

Metasequoia glyptostroboides - "Golden Dawn" redwood
Zone 4-8; Height: 25 feet, Spread: 15 feet
A grafted cultivar of the dawn redwood, with golden-green foliage. It is slower-growing than the species.

Picea abies - Norway spruce
Zone 2-7; Height: 60 feet, Spread: 30 feet
A slow-growing, drought-tolerant evergreen, native to northern Europe. Likes sun and well-drained soil. This tree can look magnificent, grown in the open, with spreading branches, while branchlets hang down.

Picea glauca - white spruce
Zone 2-6; Height: 60 feet, Spread: 20 feet
A slow-growing, drought-tolerant evergreen, native to Canada. Likes sun and well-drained soil. Grows to 60' or more.

Picea glauca "Densata" - Black Hills spruce
Zone 3-6; Height: 40 feet, Spread: 15 feet
A slow-growing evergreen, native to the Black Hills. Likes sun and moist, well-drained soil. This strain has denser, more blue foliage than the species, and does not grow quite as large.

Picea orientalis - Oriental spruce
Zone 4-7; Height: 45 feet, Spread: 15 feet
A slow-growing evergreen, native to the upper Middle East. Likes sun and well-drained soil. This has short needles and dense foliage. Grows to 40', with up to a 12' spread. Avoid dry soils. The MoBot link is for a cultivar similar to the main species.

Picea pungens - Colorado blue spruce
Zone 2-7; Height: 60 feet, Spread: 20 feet
The classic blue, columnar spruce tree, native to the Rocky Mountains. Extremely cold-hardy. Prefers well-drained, acidic soil. Protect from drought while young.

Pinus strobus - white pine
Zone 3-9; Height: 80 feet, Spread: 40 feet
Our own native white pine. Mature white pines in the English colonies belonged to the King because they were so important in providing masts for sailing ships. Unlike many other pines the needles of white pines are somewhat soft to the touch. Very fast-growing when young. The age of a tree may be approximated by counting the whorls of branches. The MoBot link claims deer resistance, but that's iffy.

Pinus virginianus - Virginia pine
Zone 4-8; Height: 30 feet, Spread: 20 feet
The pine of choice for recovering marginal sites, especially those with thin, rocky soil. The form is rather picturesque and asymmetrical, with very dark green foliage.

Sequoiadendron giganteum - giant sequoia
Easy to grow as seedlings, but possibly problematical as older trees to keep them alive. Still fun to have one.

Taxodium ascendens - pondcypress: 1 gallon
A close relative of the baldcypress, above, and sometimes included in that species. However, this has appressed scale-like leaves when mature, somewhat like arborvitae, rather than the flat needles of the classic baldcypress.

Taxodium distichum - baldcypress
Zone 4-9; Height: 70 feet, Spread: 45 feet
A tree native to the southeast US that can grow to be massive, living up to 2000 years old. This deciduous evergreen has nice yellow-brown fall color. Good for wet sites, but can be grown in dry areas. If growing by or in standing water, will send up "cypress knees." The wood is the most rot-resistant of any North American lumber.

Taxodium distichum "Falling Waters" - weeping baldcypress
Zone 5-9; Height: 20 feet, Spread: 15 feet
A weeping form of the above: the central leader grows up, but the side branches grow down. A very picturesque specimen.

Thuja plicata - western redcedar
Zone 5-7; Height: 70 feet, Spread: 25 feet
It's confusing, but the western redcedar is not a cedar, but an arborvitae (whereas the eastern redcedar is not a cedar, but a juniper). We grow and offer this version of the tree because it's moderately deer resistant. Deer regard the almost identical eastern species, Thuja occidentalis as candy. However, this one grows much larger, sometimes being called giant arborvitae. Likes sun to high shade and average to moist soil. May tolerate dry sites, but growth will be retarded. Good for hedge (tolerates clipping), screening, mass planting, or as stand-alone specimens. Expect a height of 50 feet in our climate.

Thuja plicata X standishii "Green Giant" - Green Giant arborvitae
Zone 5-8; Height: 60 feet, Spread: 18 feet
A fast-growing hybrid arborvitae that's great for green screens. Hardier than the Leyland cypress. Can grow 3' or more per year, to a total height of 40-60'. Reputed to be disease-free. Stays really green through winter.

 

Broadleaf Trees and Shrubs


Aesculus arguta - Texas buckeye
Zones 5-9; Height: 30 feet; Spread: 25 feet
A southern buckeye but hardy here. Unlike most buckeyes, this one has seven to nine leaflets (most buckeyes only have five). Grows as a small multitrunked tree. Does best in part shade. Considered by some as a variety of A. glabra, but visibly different.

Aesculus X carnea - red horsechestnut
Zones 5-8; Height: 40 feet; 35 Spread: feet
A hybrid between A. pavia and A. hippocastanum, making a small but bushy tree. Deep red flowers in May with foliage resistant to leaf scorch. Likes sun to light shade.

Aesculus flava - yellow buckeye
Zones 4-8; Height: 60 feet; Spread: 45 feet
A medium to large native tree that likes a well-drained site. Attractive yellow spring flowers. Also known as A. octandra.

Aesculus glabra - Ohio buckeye
Zones 3-7; Height: 45 feet; Spread: 40 feet
A medium native tree that prefers to grow at edge of wooded area. Ohio's official state tree.

Aesculus hippocastanum - horsechestnut
Zones 3-8; Height: 70 feet; Spread: 60 feet
A medium to large tree best used in park-like settings. This is the "chestnut" tree of the poem "Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree."

Aesculus parviflora - bottlebrush buckeye
Zones 4-8; Height: 12 feet; 15 Spread: feet
A shade-loving shrub with a mass of white flowers in June to July, sometimes later. Suckers to form dense clump.

Aralia spinosa - devil's walking-stick
Zones 4-9; Height: 20 feet; Spread: 10 feet
A suckering large shrub or small tree with trunks and leaf stems covered with thorns. Large compound leaves a little like Kentucky coffeetree. Beautiful loose clusters of small off-white flowers in summer, followed by purple fruits. Highly deer-resistant, but must be contained as it will thoroughly colonize an area.

Aronia arbutifolia - red chokeberry
Zones 4-9; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 6 feet
A drought-tolerant shrub that tolerates clay soils. White to light pink flowers in clusters, edible fruit for preserves, fruit effective well into winter, great red fall color.

Aronia melanocarpa - black chokeberry
Zones 3-8; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 6 feet
White flowers in spring and black edible fruit in fall. Fruit is a good source of vitamin C and attracts birds. An adaptable plant for naturalizing, grows in sun to shade.

Asimina triloba - pawpaw
Zones 5-9; Height: 30 feet; Spread: 30 feet
Bold tropical-looking plant with intriguing, deep maroon flowers in mid-May and edible banana/mango-flavored fruit in September. Ohio's official state native fruit. Best not isolated in full sun. We typically have the following grafted cultivars as well as the wild forms (but be aware that supplies of these are very limited):
  • Allegheny
  • Atwood
  • Benson
  • NC1
  • Pennsylvania
  • Potomac
  • Prolific
  • Rappahannock
  • Shenandoah
  • Sunflower
  • Tollgate
  • Wells

Buddleia "Blue Chip" - Blue Chip butterfly bush
Zones 5-9; Height: 2 feet; Spread: 2 feet
A hybrid butterfly bush with blue flowers.

Buddleia "Miss Molly" - Miss Molly butterfly bush
Zones 5-9; Height: 5 feet; Spread: 5 feet
A hybrid butterfly bush with striking deep red-pink flowers. Often dies back to the ground in Ohio winters, but once well-established, will sprout again and bloom in the same season.

Buxus sempervirens - boxwood
Zones 5-8; Height: 15 feet; Spread: 15 feet
A tough, deer-resistant evergreen. Likes sun to part shade. Easily kept at a desired size by regular clipping, retaining dense foliage.

Buxus sempervirens "Variegata" - variegated boxwood
Zones 6-8; Height: 5 feet; Spread: 3 feet
A tough, deer-resistant evergreen with variegated leaves. Likes sun to part shade. Easily kept at a desired size by regular clipping, retaining dense foliage.

Callicarpa bodinieri - beautyberry
Zones 6-8; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 6 feet
Intensely-colored purple berries festoon this shrub in late summer, following small purple flowers in summer. Likes to be in the sun.

Callicarpa dichotoma f. albifructa - white beautyberry
Zones 5-8; Height: 4 feet; Spread: 5 feet
A beautyberry with bright white berries.

Callicarpa "Magenta Amethyst" - Magenta Amethyst beautyberry
Zones 5-8; Height: 4 feet; Spread: 5 feet
A beautyberry with bright purple berries. The MoBot link is for a similar cultivar.

Calycanthus floridus - sweetshrub
Zones: 4-9; Height: 8 feet, Spread: 10 feet
A medium to large shrub with strawberry-red flowers (also a variety with yellow-green flowers) that become more fragrant as the day goes on. It blooms in May and sporadically throughout the summer. Like sun to partial shade.

Calycanthus floridus "Aphrodite" - Aphrodite sweetshrub
Zones 5-9; Height: 8 feet; Spread: 6 feet
A recent variety with larger leaves, larger, more showier flowers, and the most fragrant of all our selections of this genus.

Calycanthus floridus "Athens" - Athens sweetshrub
Zones: 4-8; Height: 7 feet, Spread: 7 feet
A dwarfed cultivar of the native species, with green-yellow flowers. Name refers to Athens, Georgia, not Ohio.

Calycanthus X raulstonii "Hartlage Wine" - Hartlage Wine sweetshrub
Zones: 5-9; Height: 8 feet, Spread: 8 feet
A hybrid between the American and the Chinese species, with large fragrant flowers that open early in the day.

Carpinus caroliniana - ironwood
Zones: 3-9; Height: 30 feet, Spread: 30 feet
Also known as blue beech, hornbeam, or musclewood. This species, along with Ostrya virginiana, Carya ovata, and Cornus florida, has some of the hardest wood in North America. Very commonly found in stream valleys in Appalachian woods and around Athens.

Carya illinoinensis - hardy pecan
Zones: 5-9; Height: 100 feet, Spread: 70 feet
A large, graceful tree bearing some of the world's most delicious nuts. Fully hardy in southeast Ohio. Should be transplanted when fairly small.

Carya laciniosa - kingnut hickory, shellbark hickory
Zones: 5-9; Height: 80 feet, Spread: 60 feet
A hickory that bears delicious nuts, although in a thick shell, best of all the hickories for nuts except for pecans. Strongly prefers deep, rich bottomland soils but tolerates a wide range of soil acidity. Interesting alternative to maple for making sap syrup. Should be planted as seedling or container-grown because of taproot.

Carya ovalis - red hickory
Zones: 5-9; Height: 100 feet, Spread: 80 feet
A hickory that bears edible but small nuts, tolerates a wide range of soil types. Ideal for dry ridgetop sites.

Carya ovata - shagbark hickory
Zones: 4-8; Height: 90 feet, Spread: 70 feet
A hickory that bears delicious nuts, although in a thick shell. Grows to 90' tall by 70' spread and tolerates a wide range of soil types.

Celtis occidentalis - hackberry
Zones: 2-9; Height: 60 feet, Spread: 60 feet
This can grow to be a large tree with a very massive trunk. Makes a nice shade tree. Good for birds because of the nutritious fruit.

Celtis tenuifolia - dwarf hackberry
Zones: 6-9; Height: 20 feet, Spread: 20 feet
A very well-behaved small tree, up to 20' high. Not subject to the leaf blight or galls of the common hackberry. Loves limestone but will grow in most soils. Berries turn orange then purple, with a sweet, edible rind. Must be protected from deer when young.

Cephalanthus occidentalis - buttonbush
Zones: 5-9; Height: 10 feet, Spread: 9 feet
A native shrub with an open habit, can grow in a very wet site, even in standing water. White balls of fragrant flowers in August. Good for naturalizing and for wildlife habitat.

Cercis canadensis - redbud
Zones: 4-8; Height: 25 feet, Spread: 30 feet
A small spreading tree, with purple pea-like edible flowers arrayed along branches in spring. Likes sun or shade. Avoid wet soils. Does not transplant well so should be transplanted when small.

Chionanthus virginicus - fringetree
Zones: 3-9; Height: 20 feet, Spread: 15 feet
A large multi-stemmed shrub with white fragrant flower panicles in May. Good for sun or filtered shade. Plant in moist, well-drained soil. May be male or female, but both have showy flowers; only the female has purple berries.

Cladastris kentukea - yellowwood
Zones 4-8; Height: 40 feet; Spread: 40 feet
A beautiful native tree in the legume family with panicles of intensely fragrant white pea-like flowers in May. Known from only a very few isolated native populations in Indiana, one of which is the Yellowwood State Forest, and in a few bordering states. Also known as Cladrastis lutea. May not have a good bloom every year, and may take several years after transplanting to bloom for the first time. Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons user Ulf Eliasson.

Clethra alnifolia - hummingbird clethra
Zones 3-9; Height: 5 feet; Spread: 4 feet
A great native shrub with glossy-green foliage and fragrant white flowers from July to September. likes sun or shade.

Cornus amomum - silky dogwood
Zones 5-8; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 10 feet
A great native for naturalizing. Loves wet areas but does fine in ordinary soil. Clusters of creamy-white flowers in late spring.

Cornus drummondii - roughleaf dogwood
One of the larger of the shrubby dogwoods, growing into a small tree with clusters of off-white flowers. One of the most tolerant of the dogwoods as to soils and soil moisture, even tolerating clay soils.

Cornus kousa - Kousa dogwood
Zones 5-8; Height: 30 feet; Spread: 30 feet
White flowers in May, similar to those of flowering dogwood, with large salmon to peach-colored edible raspberry-like fruit in fall and good fall color. Resistant to anthracnose. Does not do well in dry soils.

Cornus kousa "Gold Star" - Gold Star dogwood
Yellow, especially showy flowers in May, similar to those of flowering dogwood, with large salmon to peach-colored edible raspberry-like fruit in fall and good fall color. Resistant to anthracnose. Does not do well in dry soils.

Cornus obliqua - pale dogwood
Zones 4-8; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 10 feet
Similar to silky dogwood, Cornus amomum, but less dense and more westerly in range.

Cornus officinalis - sanshuyu, Korean cornel
Zones 5-8; Height: 25 feet; Spread: 25 feet
Masses of small yellow flowers in late winter with cherry-like edible fruit in late summer and good fall color. Large shrub or small tree, to 15'. Very similar to Cornus mas, the Cornelian cherry, but has a more open habit, blooms earlier, and has interesting bark. Widely used as a medicinal plant in Asia.

Cornus officinalis "Kintoki" - Kintoki cornel
Zones 5-8; Height: 15 feet; Spread: 15 feet
Masses of small yellow flowers in late winter with cherry-like edible fruit in late summer and good fall color. Large shrub or small tree, to 15'. This is an especially heavy-flowering cultivar, and has great fruit set.

Cornus officinalis "Lemon Zest" - Lemon Zest cornel
Zones 5-8; Height: 15 feet; Spread: 15 feet
Masses of small yellow flowers in late winter with cherry-like edible fruit in late summer and good fall color. Large shrub or small tree, to 15'. This is a cultivar with especially bright and larger flowers, and has great fruit set.

Cornus mas - Cornelian cherry
Zones 4-8; Height: 25 feet; Spread: 20 feet
Similar to Cornus officinalis, above.

Corylus americana - American hazel
Zones 4-9; Height: 16 feet; Spread: 15 feeet
A large shrub or small tree forming suckering clumps. Good for naturalizing in moist to average soils Like sun to light shade and produces tasty, edible nuts.

Diospyros virginiana - persimmon
Zones 4-9; Height: 60 feet; Spread: 35 feet
Often found in our woods along woods' edge or along fence lines. Pale orange, astringent wildlife-friendly fruit is edible (after first frost). Slow-growing, it is variable in height and spread. Old trees (generally, over a century old) are very valuable because of the true ebony heartwood.

Euonymus americanus - strawberry bush
Zones 5-9; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 8 feet
A curious native with glossy, deep green leaves, and eye-catching pinkish red fall fruit. Do not plant near wintercreeper or burning bush. Protect from deer! Likes moisture, and will tolerate clay soils and shade. Suckers to form clumps.

Euonymus atropurpureus - wahoo
Zones 3-7; Height: 20 feet; Spread: 20 feet
A sparse native with dark green leaves, and eye-catching pink fall fruit. Grows into a small tree. Do not plant near wintercreeper, burning bush, or other foreign Euonymus species. Protect from deer! Likes moisture, and will tolerate clay soils and shade.

Fagus grandifolia - American beech
Zones 3-9; Height: 60 feet; Spread: 50 feet
A slow-growing, ultimately large specimen tree with edible seeds. Does not grow well in clay or compacted soils, but tolerates a wide range of soil pH. Newly-emerging leaves are edible in salad or as a potherb.

Fagus orientalis - oriental beech
Zones 3-9; Height: 60 feet; Spread: 50 feet
Very similar to the American beech (above), but faster growing, and ultimately a larger tree. Newly-emerging leaves are edible in salad or as a potherb.

Fothergilla gardenii - dwarf fothergilla
Zones 5-8; Height: 3 feet; Spread: 4 feet
A nice small native with abundant fragrant "bottlebrush" flowers in May. Yellow, red and orange foliage in fall. Good for sun or partial shade and well-drained acidic soil. Does not tolerate dry soils.

Gleditsia triacanthos - honeylocust
Zones 3-8; Height: 80 feet; Spread: 70 feet
This is our native, thorny variety. Tolerates very wet soils. Trunk thorns may be several inches long. Casts an open shade. We offer this mainly for naturalizing areas.

Gymnocladus dioicus - Kentucky coffeetree
Zones 3-8; Height: 70 feet; Spread: 55 feet
Large picturesque tree with dark brown seed pods, used by genuinely desperate early settlers as coffee substitute (don't try this at home!). This tree has the largest compound leaves in North America, three feet long and two feet wide. Great profile in winter. Needs sunny site with deep, well-drained soil. Formerly the state tree of Kentucky (and as such, it was a unique state tree; the state legislature opted instead to change it to the tree most commonly used as a state tree throughout US history, the tuliptree).

Halesia tetraptera - Carolina silverbells
Zones 4-8; Height: 40 feet; Spread: 35 feet
A shrub or small tree that is native to more southerly areas of the United States, but is hardy here. Many beautiful white flowers in spring, followed by curious four-winged seeds. Also known as Halesia carolina.

Hamamelis X intermedia - early witchhazel
Zones 5-8; Height: 15 feet; Spread: 15 feet
Hybrids between H. japonica and H. mollis: Several named varieties of this large shrub that blooms in February and March with yellow flowers that have narrow, twisted petals.

Hamamelis virginiana - common witchhazel
Zones 3-8; Height: 20 feet; Spread: 20 feet
An understory shrub or small tree, with yellow flowers in November that have narrow, twisted petals.

Hibiscus syriacus - rose of Sharon
Zones 5-8; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 10 feet
A member of the Hibiscus genus with showy and numerous flowers. This woody shrub is typically taller than wide. Very adaptable to difficult conditions. This variety has more white in the flowers than the one shown in the photograph.

Hydrangea - hydrangea
Zones 3-9; Height: 5 feet; Spread: 5 feet
We have a variety of these shrubs with heads of white or sometimes other-colored flowers. Protect these shrubs from deer.

Hydrangea quercifolia - oakleaf hydrangea
Zones 5-9; Height: 8 feet; Spread: 8 feet
This is one of the more striking of the hydrangeas with its large, lobed, oak-like leaves. Protect from deer! Cover on exceptionally cold winter nights to preserve bloom potential.

Hypericum prolificum - shrubby St. Johns-wort
Grows 4' tall and wide with bright yellow flowers in summer. Likes un to part shade. This is used as a medicinal.

Ilex opaca - American holly
Zones 5-9; Height: 30 feet; Spread: 20 feet
Our classic American holly. In nature, can grow to a 60' tree, but usually a large shrub (with pyramidal form) in our area, up to 20' tall. Bright red berries against green foliage in the winter, making it a great bird tree, but these are dioecious, so there are males and females and only females have berries. These are seedlings, so they're not sexed. Very tolerant of most soils and low-maintenance. However, avoid alkaline soils or be prepared to give acid fertilizer.

Ilex verticillata "Red Sprite" - Red Sprite winterberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 3 feet; Spread: 3 feet
A dwarf version of this shrub species, to 3', with masses of attractive red berries in autumn. Slow-growing, tolerates wet soils. Needs both male and female plants for fruit set.

Ilex verticillata "Winter Red" - Winter Red winterberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 8 feet
A medium to large shrub with masses of attractive red berries in autumn. Slow-growing, tolerates wet soils. Needs both male and female plants for fruit set.

Ilex verticillata "Winter Gold" - Winter Gold winterberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 8 feet
A medium to large shrub with masses of attractive gold berries in autumn. Slow-growing, tolerates wet soils. Needs both male and female plants for fruit set.

Itea virginica "Little Henry" - Little Henry sweetspire
Zones 5-9; Height: 3 feet; Spread: 3 feet
A small to medium native shrub with fragrant white flowers in Jule to July. Has a mounding habit and good red-purple fall color. This adaptable plant grows in sun to shade, given sufficient moisture.

Juglans cinerea - butternut
A medium to large tree, bearing delicious but oily nuts. Grows to 60' with similar spread. Susceptible to butternut canker, a disease that has wiped out most trees in the wild. However, these were grown from nuts from a mother tree that appears to be resistant, but we can't guarantee that.

Kerria japonica - gypsy rose or Chinese rose
Zones 4-9; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 10 feet
A medium size shrub. Yellow flowers in spring, then sporadically through the summer. Good for partially shaded area. When grown in shade, can be trained as a vine. MoBot link is for a similar cultivar.

Kolkwitzia amabilis - beautybush
A medium to large shrub, up to ten feet high and across, with very heavy spring bloom. Flowers are pink with yellow inside. This shrub tolerates light shade and clay soils. If pruning is desired, prune back immediately after flowering to ensure good flowering the following year.

Leptodermis oblonga - Leptodermis
Zones 5-8; Height: 1.5 feet; Spread: 2 feet
Small, fragrant, lilac-colored flowers festoon this dwarf shrub through most of the growing season. Suckers to form clumps; very low-maintenace.

Lindera benzoin - spicebush
Zones 4-9; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 12 feet
An understory plant for a moist location with small yellow flowers in April. Has male and female plants; females have showy red berries in autumn. Both sexes are moderately showy in bloom. Dried berries, leaves and twigs have all been used as flavorings and in teas.

Liquidambar styraciflua - sweetgum
Zones 5-9; Height: 80 feet; Spread: 60 feet
A native wetlands tree that does fine in normal soil. Corky bark and great fall color, with yellow, red, orange and purple. Prickly fall fruit can be a problem in high-traffic areas.

Liquidambar styraciflua "Slender Silhouette" - Slender Silhouette sweetgum
Zones 5-9; Height: 50 feet; Spread: 6 feet
A native wetlands tree that does fine in normal soil. Corky bark and great fall color, with yellow, red, orange and purple. Prickly fall fruit can be a problem in high-traffic areas. This cultivar is very columnar, never spreading. The MoBot link is for the species, not this cultivar.

Lonicera caerulea - honeyberry, haskap
Zones 2-7; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 6 feet
A non-native but non-invasive honeysuckle shrub with sweet, tasty edible berries. Often grown as a food crop. Flowers and berries are both showy. Grows to six feet tall and wide. We are at the southern limit for this species, so protect from heat in the summer. Do not let dry out until well established.

See our special Magnolia page, with 20 different types.


See our special Maple page, with two dozen different types of Japanese maples plus species maples.


Nyssa sylvatica - blackgum
Zones 3-9; Height: 60 feet; Spread: 30 feet
A native tree that will tolerate both dry and extremely wet soils, with exceptional fall color. Also called tupelo or pepperridge. Grown in full sun, the leaves are thick and glossy.

Osmanthus heterophyllus - holly olive
Ready in late spring of 2017. A large shrub that resembles a holly, but is actually in the olive family. The leaves of young plants are spiky, resembling American or English holly, but are simple leaves when older. Clusters of small, highly fragrant white flowers in fall. These usually do not set berries in our climate. Does best with partial or afternoon shade. Mulch well in winter. To 10' high and broad.

Ostrya virginiana - hop hornbeam
Zone: 3-9; Height: 35 feet, Width: 25 feet
A small to medium-size native tree, characteristic of upland woods. This species, Carpinus caroliniana, Cornus florida, and Carya ovata have the hardest woods known in North America. Finely-shreddy bark makes mature trees easy to pick out. Seed clusters are ornamental, resembling hops flowers. Moderately drought resistant.

Parrotia persica - parrotia
Zones 4-8; Height: 30 feet; Spread: 25 feet
A witch-hazel cousin from the Caucasus Mountains in southern Asia. A four-season plant wkith interesting exfoliating bark. Reddish-purple foliage when emerging and brilliant orange, red and yellow fall color. Grows in sun to light shade and well-drained soil.

Physocarpus opulifolius "Summer Wine" - Summer Wine ninebark
Zones 3-8; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 6 feet
A member of the rose family, with clusters of small light pink flowers in summer. This cultivar has beautiful, deeply-cut dark red leaves. Tolerates wet soils.

Platanus occidentalis - American sycamore
Zones 4-9; Height: 100 feet; Spread: 100 feet
A large, fast-growing tree for a moist or dry site. Tolerates flooding and is good for holding soil on stream banks. Some old specimens have trunks ten feet in diameter.

Prunus americana - American plum
Zones 3-8; Height: 25 feet; Spread: 25 feet
A native plum with attractive blossoms and edible (but not terribly tasty) fruit; a great wildlife tree. Fragrant flowers emerge in March. Spreads and forms patches by suckering.

Quercus alba - white oak
Zones 3-9; Height: 100 feet; Spread: 100 feet
The quintessential oak tree of the northeast United States, often growing to immense size. Important mast tree for wildlife. Old, low-branched trees surrounded by much younger woodland are often called 'wolf trees.' Does not tolerate soil disturbance once established.

Quercus macrocarpa - bur oak
Zones 3-8; Height: 80 feet; Spread: 80 feet
A magnificent, slow-growing specimen tree that needs a lot of space. Has a rough, corky bark, with the largest acorns of any oak, borne abundantly, and ones that are prized by wildlife for food. Prefers growing in the open. Trunks can get quite massive. Do not disturb soil once established.

Quercus michauxii - swamp chestnut oak
Zones 5-9; Height: 80 feet; Spread: 80 feet
One of the most majestic of oaks, thriving in wet soils but also regular soils. The second-largest acorns of American oaks, and sometimes edible for humans out-of-hand. A gorgeous tree. The Kentucky state champion, pictured, is over 100 feet tall, with a more than 100 feet spread.

Quercus pagoda - cherrybark oak
A southern oak species, but hardy here. Similar to red oak but not usually as large, with more flaky bark.

Quercus prinus - chestnut oak
Zones 4-8; Height: 70 feet; Spread: 70 feet
A drought-tolerant oak that also tolerates poor soils. Very hard wood. Performs well in almost any soil. One of the best oaks for acorn production for wildlife food. Also known as Quercus montana.

Quercus rubra - red oak
Zones 4-8; Height: 80 feet; Spread: 80 feet
Possibly the best of all oaks for a shade tree. One of the more reliable acorn producers. Sometimes has good red fall color. Can grow to be very large - our local county champion has a trunk almost six feet in diameter. Also known as Quercus borealis.

Rhododendron "Karen" - Karens azalea
Zones 5-8; Height: 4 feet; Spread: 4 feet
A beautiful purple azalea. Plant in partial shade, never in full sun. It must have good drainage in acid soil.

Rhododendron schlippenbachii - Schlippenbach azalea
Zones 4-7; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 5 feet
Reputed to be one of the world's most beautiful azaleas. Flowers are fragrant. Plant in part-shade. It must have good drainage in acid soil.

Rubus occidentalis - black raspberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 7 feet; Spread: 10 feet
Our native raspberry, very site-tolerant. Suckers to fill an area, so requires some control.

Rubus odoratus - flowering raspberry
Zones 3-8; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 12 feet
A non-spiny native raspberry with large, beautiful, fragrant, purple flowers. Fruit is edible but insipid. Easy to grow.

Rubus "Ohio's Treasure" - Ohio's Treasure everbearing black raspberry
Finally, an everbearing black raspberry! New canes will bear a first crop August-October, and a second crop in their second year in late spring to early summer. Medium-sized, tasty fruit.

Rubus parviflorus - thimbleberry
Zones 3-10; Height: 8 feet; Spread: 8 feet
A northern and western relative of the native flowering raspberry, but with white flowers and very tasty fruit.

Salix babylonica - weeping willow
Zones 6-8; Height: 50 feet; Spread: 50 feet
A moisture-loving tree, often planted by ponds, with long, weeping branches. A well-known plant that's fast growing. Keep it away from plumbing! Avoid planting in frost pockets or where it may be subject to harsh winter winds.

Salix integra "Hakuro Nishiki" - Hakuro Nishiki variegated willow
Zones 5-7; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 7 feet
Also known as dappled willow. "Hakuro-Nishiki" means "white-spotted," because of variegated foliage. Native to east Asia.

Sambucus canadensis - American elderberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 12 feet
The regular native elderberry. Has broad, flat-topped clusters of deep purple berries in the fall after flat-topped clusters of small white flowers in the spring. Good for making elderberry wine, and the birds love the berries as well.

Sambucus canadensis "Adam" - Adam elderberry
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Zones 3-9; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 12 feet
A cultivar that produces heavily. Found in New York. The MoBot link is for the species, not this cultivar.

Sambucus canadensis "Bob Gordon" - Bob Gordon elderberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 12 feet
A cultivar that will fruit on new wood, simplifying pruning regimens. From Missouri. The MoBot link is for the species, not this cultivar.

Sambucus canadensis "Ranch" - Ranch elderberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 12 feet
A cultivar that does especially well in poor soils, fruits heavily. Discovered in Kansas. The MoBot link is for the species, not this cultivar.

Sambucus canadensis "Wyldewood" - Wyldewood elderberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 12 feet
A cultivar that has especially large fruit, second only to the York elderberry, below, and also is a heavy bearer. The MoBot link is for the species, not this cultivar.

Sambucus canadensis "York" - York elderberry
Zones 3-9; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 12 feet
The cultivar with the largest berries, making it expecially good for pies, etc. The MoBot link is for the species, not this cultivar.

Sambucus pubens - American red-berried elder
Zones 3-7; Height: 12 feet; Spread: 15 feet
Native to the Appalachian mountains and much of the northernmost northern hemisphere, the berries are in a denser clump and much more showy than the native elderberry. The berries are edible but MUST be cooked first. Likes moist soils. Also known as Sambucus racemosa var. pubens.

Sassafras albidum - sassafras
Zones 4-9; Height: 60 feet; Spread: 40 feet
A tree with tiny yellow flowers in the spring and interesting black fruit on bright red pedicels in late summer, to 60'. Exceptional fall color. All around a beautiful lawn tree but it does sucker, so mowing around it is advised. The bark of the roots has long been used to make a hot tea and in some forms of root beer. Studies have found trace amounts of a carcinogen in the roots, so use at your own discretion!

Sorbaria sorbifolia - false spirea
Zones 2-8; Height: 8 feet; Spread: 8 feet
A shrub with compound leaves in the rose family. Native to Asia. Masses of snowy white blossoms in June-July. Tolerates heavy pruning.

Spirea japonica - Japanese spirea
Zones 3-8; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 7 feet
A dusky-red-flowering spirea with small leaves, growing to 4' tall.

Symphoricarpos orbiculatus - coralberry
Zones 2-7; Height: 5 feet; Spread: 8 feet
The closest thing we have to a native shrub honeysuckle in southeast Ohio. Berries don't show until mid-autumn, but are very showy from then on. Freely suckers to make patches. Very tolerant of soils.

Tilia americana "Moltkei" - von Moltke basswood
The BEST of the linden bee trees, in fact, one of the world's best bee trees, blooming in summer. Originally thought to be a hybrid, now thought to be a variety of the native T. americana. Grows to be a large tree, up to 90'x80'. The MoBot link is not for this cultivar, but for the species.

Tilia americana fastigiata - fastigiate linden
An excellent bee tree, but one with a narrow branch spread -- while tall, up to 80', only maybe 20' wide. The MoBot link is not for this cultivar, but for the species.

Tilia oliveri - silver linden
Another excellent bee tree from central China, growing to 50' or more. The bright silver coating on the undersides of the leaves is striking.

Tilia petiolaris - weeping silver linden
A tree with weeping branches, sometimes regarded as a variety of T. tomentosa. Leaves have silvery underside. Grows up to 70' or more. Native to southwestern Asia into Europe.

Vaccinium angustifolium - barrens blueberry
Zones 2-8; Height: 2 feet; Spread: 2 feet
The classic wild blueberry of New England. This is the species harvested in the blueberry berries, and sold as canned and frozen wild blueberries. White flowers in May-June. Produces small but tasty berries. Great to use as a shrub groundcover. Benefits by heavy pruning or burning every few years.

Vaccinium corymbosum "Jersey" - Jersey blueberry
A very late-season blueberry, very sweet berries. One of the easiest and most reliable blueberries to grow. To 6'x3'. Great fall color.

Vaccinium corymbosum x V. angustifolium "North Country" - North Country blueberry
A hybrid "half-high" blueberry, early to mid-season, with dark-green foliage; one of the best for ornamental landscaping, or even for patio container growing. To 2'x3'.

Vaccinium corymbosum "Duke" - Duke blueberry
An early blueberry, but it blooms late and the fruit ripens quickly, so safer from frost; heavy fruit production. To 6'x3'. Great fall color.

Vaccinium corymbosum "Blue Crop" - Blue Crop blueberry
A mid-season blueberry. To 5'x3'. Great fall color.

Viburnum dentatum - arrowwood
Zones 2-8; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 10 feet
A white-flowering native shrub with purple berries in fall. This durable shrub is good in sun or shade as a hedge or for naturalizing. Glossy leaves in full sun, tolerates wet soils. Highly deer-resistant.

Viburnum nudum "Winterthur" - Winterthur witherod, possumhaw viburnum
Zones 5-9; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 10 feet
One of the most beautiful of viburnums. Extremely glossy, dark green foliage, creamy-white fragrant flower clusters, and berry clusters mixing a range of colors.

Viburnum opulus - European highbush cranberry
Zones 3-8; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 10 feet
A compact viburnum with decorative clusters of brightly-colored berries. Propagated by seed from plants with golden berries, but some may have red berries. Berries are used like cranberries.

Vitex agnus-castus - chastetree
Zones 6-9; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 8 feet
This tree has feathery leaves topped by pyramidal spikes of fragrant, small lavender flowers. Flowers begin in late summer and continue through the fall. May grow up to 12' tall but may be killed back to roots in severe winters. However, it will reliably resprout and bloom on new wood. Leaves are fragrant when rubbed.

Vitex agnus-castus "Pink Pinnacle" - Pink Pinnacle chastetree
Zones 6-9; Height: 10 feet; Spread: 8 feet
A cultivar of the chastetree with more pinkish blossoms.

Weigela florida - weigela
Zones 4-8; Height: 6 feet; Spread: 8 feet
A tough, deer-resistant shrub with pink flowers. Likes sun to light shade.